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William T. and Ann H. Scott Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 97-15
The arrangement of the first collection was followed for these materials and the majority of the text of the earlier collection guide, such as the biographical sketches, scope and content note, and series and subseries descriptions were adapted from those written by Victoria Yturralde for collection 95-92.

The majority of materials comprising the Ann and William Scott Papers (95-92) were acquired in 1995, when the Scotts moved to a Quaker retirement facility in Santa Rosa. Previously, materials relating to Ann Scott's work on Census U.S.A. were deposited in Special Collections and remain a separate entity, as do the archives of William Scott, which are housed in the University Archives.

Two related collections were also donated by the Scotts to the Special Collections Department and remain separate from the Ann and William Scott Papers. The records of the Reno Friends Meeting, a Quaker worship group co-founded by the Scotts, and Sierra Interfaith Action for Peace, a non-profit peace organization also co-founded by the Scotts, were acquired in 1995. This accession of Ann and William Scott Papers is comprised of 6 cubic feet of material. The inclusive dates of the collection range between 1954 and 1993.

The arrangement of this accession follows that of the earlier Scott collection and where possible, original order has been maintained. This was feasible primarily with the professional records of Ann and William Scott, while many of the personal and political papers of the Scotts arrived in a very miscellaneous form. Correspondence addressed to either Ann or William was organized into their respective personal papers, while correspondence addressed jointly to Ann and William became part of their family papers. A portion of the personal correspondence, 1960-1961 between Ann and William has been restricted at the request of the Scotts until after their deaths. Because of the cooperative nature of Ann and William's relationship, the majority of the religious and political materials in the collection were organized into a section of their family papers, even though one or the other may have been more involved in a particular organization or peace action. Exceptions to this arrangement occur when materials relating to a particular endeavor have clearly been placed with an individual's personal papers.

The scope of the Ann and William Scott papers reflects the rich life of two people deeply committed to their professional careers and their spiritual convictions. Ann's professional papers document her struggles and development as a writer, including many revisions of a particular work and comments by fellow writers. William's professional papers reflect the growth of his interest from pure physics to the philosophy of science. On a personal level, the William and Ann Scott papers document family relationships and friendships through extensive correspondence and memorabilia. Their personal spiritual reflections and service to the Society of Friends and to peaceful social change is documented through journal notes, organizational records, and subject files. Except for royalty statements the majority of the Scott financial records were extracted.

In accession 95-92, the Scott extended family was represented through the papers of Abraham McLean Scott, William's great-grandfather; Charles P.G. Scott, William's grandfather; Carl and Dorothy Scott, William's parents; and Roderick and Agnes Scott, William's uncle and aunt. In the second collection, 97­15, there are only a few letters from Agnes and Roderick Scott and Carl and Dorothy Scott.

As with collection 95-92, one large portion of the new Scott collection consists of brochures, flyers, newsletters, and correspondence relating to a wide variety of social organizations and concerns. This material, arranged alphabetically by organization and by subject, offers a unique glimpse of the modern peace movement. Subjects include conscientious objection to World War II, the Vietnam conflict, nuclear disarmament, civil liberties, race relations, capital punishment, domestic violence, poverty, Native Americans, Central America, and much more. Usually, the emphasis in these materials is on Nevada organizations and actions, although some national material is included.

Of particular interest in the Ann and William Scott Papers is the group of materials relating to the national, regional, and local arms of the American Friends Service Committee, a Quaker based public service organization whose purpose is to promote peace and nonviolent change. Flyers, brochures, pamphlets, newsletters, and correspondence show the variety of programs and interests of this influential organization over the last fifty years. The inception of the Reno Area Program, the development of its local programs, and its subsequent restructuring reveal the inner workings of a unique organization with unusual corporate goals and methods.

To ensure a complete understanding of Ann and William Scott's lives, please consult the collection guides to the other Scott papers, 95-92, 97-27, and 99-26.

Dates

  • 1954-1993

Creator

Restrictions

Personal correspondence restricted until after the death of William and Ann Scott. Other materials available for on-site use; advance notice suggested. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Extent

6 Cubic Feet (5 boxes)

Abstract

The collection consists of the personal papers and professional records of Ann and William Scott and their extended family. It includes documentation of Ann Scott's career as a children's author, such as manuscripts, correspondence, and academic and employment records and William Scott's research files in physics, teaching records, articles and correspondence related to cloud physics.

Biographical Note

Ann Herbert Scott (1926- )

Ann Herbert Howe was born in Philadelphia on November 19, 1926, the only child of Henry Laux Herbert, a newspaper editor, and Gladys Howe Herbert, a singer and artist. She was educated at a Quaker boarding school and later attended the University of Pennsylvania, where she graduated with distinction and honors in English and was class valedictorian. After teaching for a few years at various Friends (Quaker) schools, she entered Yale University, where she earned a Master's Degree in Social Ethics in 1958.

While at Yale, Ann became involved with and later employed by the Wider City Parish, an interdenominational group ministry program focusing on the problems of inner city children. She developed a program called "Link," which paired one Yale student with a few children in an ongoing counseling venture. She spent several summers as a camp counselor, and later director, of the University Girls Camp, which offered low-income teen girls the opportunity to escape the stresses of the city and to explore their spiritual beliefs. Ann did volunteer work at the Elm Haven Housing Project, the Dixwell Area Teenage Committee, the Social Relations Committee of the Council of Churches, and the Big Brother program. Ann met William Scott during his sabbatical at Yale in 1960, where they both attended Quaker worship services.

After moving to Reno in 1961, Ann began to explore her interest in multiethnic children's literature, and in 1964 published her first book, Big Cowboy Western, one of very few books at the time to depict African American inner-city life. She published twelve more children's books, including beautifully illustrated counting and picture books, many emphasizing Nevada or western desert themes. In addition, Ann also published a popular book on the U.S. Census for high school and college students.

Ann's interest in ethnic children's literature, coupled with her commitment to her community, led her to plan, develop, and direct a variety of festivals and workshops aimed at increasing literacy in Nevada. In 1979, she worked with librarians and teachers to create "Open Door to the Humanities," bringing popular children's authors to remote Nevada communities. Ann also planned and directed "All the Colors of the Race: A Festival of Ethnic Children's Writers" in 1982, which brought the Reno and University community together to explore ethnicity and culture in general, and in children's literature in particular. Ann co founded the Children's Literature Interest Group in Reno, which has planned the yearly "Art of the Children's Book Festival" since 1982, and has also been an active participant in several local writers groups.

Ann's Quaker beliefs have led her to live a life of commitment to pacifism, political action, and service to others. Upon her arrival in Reno, she helped form the Reno Area Committee of the American Friends Service Organization, whose activities included acquiring assistance for the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe, and lobbying for prison reform and for victims of domestic violence-Ann and William Scott also co-founded the Reno Friends Meeting, the West Coast Quaker Association on Religion and Psychology, and Sierra Interfaith Action for Peace.

At the local level, Ann was committed to interdenominational solutions to a variety of social and political concerns. She helped plan vigils, fasts, walks, runs, tree plantings, educational forums, and discussion meetings as ways of furthering the peace movement in Nevada. The war in Vietnam, civil rights, poverty, women's equality, Central America, the MX missile, the death penalty, the nuclear freeze movement, and much, much more all found expression in Nevada, largely through the efforts of Ann Scott.

In 1995, Ann and William Scott moved to the Friends House, a Quaker retirement facility in Santa Rosa, California.

William Taussig Scott (1916-1999)

William Taussig Scott was born in 1916 in Yonkers, New York, to Carl and Dorothea Scott. He attended Scarborough School, a college preparatory school, and graduated from Swarthmore College in 1937. He received his graduate degree in physics from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where for two years he held a Rackham Fellowship.

While at Swarthmore College, William joined the Society of Friends and began a lifelong devotion to Quaker action and theological discussion. He was a conscientious objector during World War II, and received a deferment to teach civilians. After three years at Amherst, William accepted a position at Smith College, where he remained for sixteen years. His summers were usually spent at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he studied multiple scattering theory and worked with Samuel Goudsmit on time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

In 1959 William received a National Science Faculty Fellowship and spent a sabbatical year at Yale University, working with Henry Margenau on quantum measurement theory and studying theology with Robert Calhoun and other Divinity School faculty. In the spring of 1960 he met Ann Howe Herbert, a fellow Quaker. Their common interests, goals, and religious beliefs bonded their relationship. In 1961 William obtained a position at the University of Nevada, Reno, to create a graduate program in the Physics Department. After he established his residency he divorced his first wife, Helen, and married Ann. Together they decided to make their permanent home in Nevada.

During his tenure at the University of Nevada, Reno, William continued to pursue his interests in science, religion, and peace, and became an activist in both the University and local communities. At the University, he formed the Peace Studies Group, brought distinguished guests like Andrew Sakahrov and Kenneth Boulding to speak, and directed the Committee on Philosophical Inquiry, which developed courses bridging the gaps between disciplines. His courses on "Science and Religion" and "Philosophy and Methods of Physical Science" were well-attended by both students and colleagues, and he frequently attended conferences and gave papers on the topic of social responsibility and scientists.

William Scott was a prolific writer and published numerous research papers in theoretical physics, atmospheric physics, and the philosophy of science. He published two editions of a basic textbook on electricity and magnetism, and a biography of Nobel Prize nominee Erwin Shrodinger. He also served as associate editor of the American Journal of Physics and a referee for several physics journals. One of William's articles, a review of Michael Polanyi's Personal Knowledge, facilitated an ongoing correspondence with the author, and in 1969 William received a National Science Foundation History and Philosophy of Science grant for preliminary research on a biography of Polanyi. William spent his sabbatical year at oxford University, studying the philosophy of science under Polanyi and Ron Harre.

William's religious and moral beliefs led him to write and speak tirelessly on the subject of peace and nonviolent social change. His particular focus was on the dangers of nuclear weapons, a subject he approached as both a scientist and a Quaker. William headed the Peace Education Committee of the Reno Area Program of the American Friends Service Committee, and was a member of the East-West Committee of the Pacific Yearly Meeting. He also served on the College Park Education Association, and helped create John Woolman School, a Quaker boarding school in Grass Valley, California.

William Scott's efforts toward the cause of peace earned him the Thornton Peace Prize in both 1972 and 1990.

In 1995, William and Ann Scott moved to Friends House, a Quaker retirement facility in Santa Rosa, California. William did in February, 1999.

Arrangement

Group 1: Ann Scott Papers Subgroup 1: Professional records •Series 1: Publications •Series 2: Activities •Series 3: Associations

Subgroup 2: Personal papers •Series 1: Diaries and personal notes •Series 2: Calendars •Series 3: Personal correspondence •Series 4: School records •Series 5: Employment records •Series 6: Peace and political concerns

Group 2: William Scott Papers Subgroup 1: Professional records •Series 1: Physics research and publications •Series 2: Philosophy of science research and publications •Series 3: Grants and sabbaticals •Series 4: Conferences •Series 5: Associations •Series 6: Speeches and articles •Series 7: Teaching •Series 8: Correspondence •Series 9: Reprints and bibliographical notes

Subgroup 2: Personal papers •Series 1: Personal correspondence •Series 2: Financial records •Series 3: School records •Series 4: Quaker concerns •Series 5: Peace and political concerns

Group 3: Scott Family Papers Subgroup 1: Ann and William Scott Family Papers •Series 1: Correspondence •Series 2: Financial and legal records •Series 3: Family concerns •Series 4: Quaker concerns •Subseries 1: American Friends Service Committee •Subseries 2: AFSC Regional Offices •Subseries 3: AFSC Reno Area Program •Subseries 4: Quaker meetings and conferences •Subseries 5: Quaker-related organizations •Series 5: Peace and political concerns

Subgroups 2-4: No materials were present

Subgroup 5: Roderick and Agnes Scott papers •Sub-subgroup 1: Agnes Scott papers •Series 1-2; 4: No materials were present •Series 3: Correspondence

•Sub-subgroup 2: Roderick Scott papers •Series 1; 3-5: No materials were present •Series 2: Correspondence
The papers of Ann and William Scott have been divided into the following groups and subgroups, and series and subseries, mirroring the arrangement of collection 95-92. There were no materials for some of the original subgroups and series.

Group 1: Ann Scott Papers

  1. Group 1, Series 1: Professional records
  2. Group 1, Series 1, Subseries 1: Publications
  3. Group 1, Series 1, Subseries 2: Activities
  4. Group 1, Series 1, Subseries 3: Associations
  5. Group 1,Series 2: Personal Papers
  6. Group 1, Series 2, Subseries 1: Diaries and Personal Notes
  7. Group 1, Series 2, Subseries 2: Calendars
  8. Group 1, Series 2, Subseries 3: Personal Correspondence
  9. Group 1, Series 2, Subseries 4: School Records
  10. Group 1, Series 2, Subseries 5: Employment Records
  11. Group 1, Series 2, Subseries 6: Peace and Political Concerns

Group 2: William Scott Papers

  1. Group 2, Series 1: Professional Records
  2. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 1: Physics Research and Publications
  3. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 2: Philosophy of Science Research and Publications
  4. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 3: Grants and Sabbaticals
  5. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 4: Conferences
  6. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 5: Associations
  7. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 6: Speeches and Articles
  8. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 7: Teaching
  9. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 8: Correspondence
  10. Group 2, Series 1, Subseries 9: Reprints and Bibliographical Notes
  11. Group 2, Series 2: Personal Papers
  12. Group 2, Series 2, Subseries 1: Personal Correspondence
  13. Group 2, Series 2, Subseries 2: Financial records
  14. Group 2, Series 2, Subseries 3: School Records
  15. Group 2, Series 2, Subseries 4: Quaker Concerns
  16. Group 2, Series 2, Subseries 5: Peace and Political Concerns

Group 3: Scott Family Papers

  1. Group 3, Series 1: Ann and William Scott Family Papers
  2. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries 1: Correspondence
  3. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries 2: Financial and Legal Records
  4. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries 3: Family Concerns
  5. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries 4: Quaker Concerns
  6. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries, Sub-subseries 1: American Friends Service Committee
  7. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries, Sub-subseries 2: AFSC Regional Offices
  8. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries, Sub-subseries 3: AFSC Reno Area Program
  9. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries, Sub-subseries 4: Quaker meetings and conferences
  10. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries, Sub-subseries 5: Quaker-related organizations
  11. Group 3, Series 1, Subseries 5: Peace and political concerns
  12. Group 3, Series 2: No Materials
  13. Group 3, Series 3: No Materials
  14. Group 3, Series 4: No Materials
  15. Group 3, Series 5: Roderick and Agnes Scott papers
  16. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 1: Agnes Scott papers
  17. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 1, Sub-subseries 1: No Materials
  18. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 1, Sub-subseries 2: No Materials
  19. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 1, Sub-subseries 3: Correspondence
  20. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 1, Sub-subseries 4: No Materials
  21. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 2: Roderick Scott Papers
  22. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 2, Sub-subseries 1: No Materials
  23. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 2, Sub-subseries 2: Correspondence
  24. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 2, Sub-subseries 3: No Materials
  25. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 2, Sub-subseries 4: No Materials
  26. Group 3, Series 5, Subseries 2, Sub-subseries 5: No Materials

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Collection was donated by Ann and William Scott in 1997.

Related Archival Materials

William T. and Ann H. Scott papers, 95-92. Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno.

William T. and Ann H. Scott papers, 97-27. Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno.

William T. Scott Papers, 99-26. Special Collections, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno.

William T. Scott records, AC 0408. University Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno.

A Part of

Nevada women's archives.
Title
A Guide to the William T. and Ann H. Scott Papers
Status
completed
Author
Susan Searcy
Date
August 12, 1997
Description rules
dacs

Repository Details

Part of the University of Nevada, Reno. Special Collections Department Repository

Contact:
Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center
1664 N. Virginia St.
Reno Nevada 89557-0322 USA
775-682-5665
775-682-5724 (Fax)