Woodworth Mill and Sluice Company Payment Slips

 Collection
Identifier: 2017-75

Scope and Contents

Collection contains six employee payment slips for August and September 1874 for work on company flumes and sluices signed by W. H. Armstrong. The company was listed as both the Woodworth Mill and the Woodworth Sluice Company on the slips. Noted on the back of the slips is the signature of the company accountant who paid the amount due to the workers. Of interest on some slips are notes to keep a portion of the payment for room and board.

Dates

  • 1874 August-September

Creator

Restrictions

Collection is open for research. Materials must be used on-site; advance notice suggested. Access to parts of this collection may be restricted under provisions of state or federal law.

Historical Note

Located on the Carson River, the Woodworth Mill was built in 1864 at a cost of $75,000. By 1869, it contained 24 stamps, 12 pans, and had a capacity of 40 tons per day. In 1871, James G. Fair and John W. Mackay of the Pacific Mill and Mining Company purchased the mill and began an overhaul under the supervision of S. Fountain. They installed a new turbine wheel of 240 horsepower along with a dozen new pans of the largest scale. In 1874, the mill started crushing 40 tons a day of Silver Hill Mine ore. The 1880 census lists 31 employees at the mill: two amalgamators, one blacksmith, one carpenter, two engineers, and 25 laborers.

The Woodworth Sluice was one of the longest sluices ever built. It was composed of 12 individual sluices side by side, each 19 inches wide. Each sluice was separated by a 1.25 inch wide piece of wood. The total length of the sluice was 1,700 feet long. It took 627 gallons of water per minute to wash the tailings material in the sluice.

[Much of the above information is taken from the following source: Webster, Daniel D. Mills Along the Carson River. Arcadia Publishing: Charleston SC, 2015]

Extent

0.41 Linear Feet (6 items)

Language of Materials

English

Overview

Located on the Carson River, the Woodworth Mill was built in 1864 and, by 1869, contained 24 stamps, 12 pans, and had a capacity of 40 tons per day. In 1871, James G. Fair and John W. Mackay of the Pacific Mill and Mining Company purchased the mill. The Woodworth Sluice was one of the longest sluices ever built. Collection contains employee payment slips for August and September 1874 for work on company flumes and sluices signed by W. H. Armstrong.

Arrangement

Unarranged.

Immediate Source of Acquisition

Purchased from Holabird Western Americana Collections, LLC in October 2017.

Creator

Title
Guide to the Woodworth Mill and Woodworth Sluice Companies Payment Slips
Status
Completed
Author
Jessica Maddox
Date
October 2017
Description rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
Language of description
English
Script of description
Latin

Repository Details

Part of the University of Nevada, Reno. Special Collections Department Repository

Contact:
Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center
1664 N. Virginia St.
Reno Nevada 89557-0322 USA
775-682-5665
775-682-5724 (Fax)